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THATKid Tuesday -- Continuous Narrative!
13 February 2018
  • THATKid Tuesday

THATKid Tuesday -- Continuous Narrative!

THATKid Tuesday is a monthly dose of Art History for kids, which will usually be posted on the first Tuesday of the month. In this series we’ll be blogging about different terms from the THATKid glossary we’ve created to help kids understand some of the art history terms that pop up in our hunts.  

Continuous Narrative is when one painting, or piece of art, tells different parts of a story all at once. This means that the same figures are often shown over and over again in the same piece.This Greek Gorgon Pot, part of the Beauty & the Bestiary hunt at the Louvre, is an example of Continuous Narrative.This Greek pot shows Perseus killing the monstrous Gorgon named Medusa. After Perseus has killed Medusa the pot also shows him being chased by Medusa’s Gorgon sisters. Kind of like a pre-classical movie or Snapchat story!

Here’s Medusa at the British Museum:


Bronze head of a marine Medusa,


British Musem, Roman Artwork, 50-75AD



Fra Angelico also has an example of Continuous Narrative (left), telling us the story of St Dominic’s life in the
pradella. 

If you go on our THATMuse hunt at the British Museum you’ll see yet another example of continuous narrative involving someone being chased, although this time it’s the people chasing the ‘beasts’ and not the other way around. The Assyrian Lion Hunt from Mesopotamia shows different stages of a lion hunt, including the fate of this unfortunate lion on the left! Although other parts of the story might make you feel a bit
less sorry for the lions and a little more scared of them – look at the muscles in that lion’s arm, look at those claws!

Lion Hunt, British Museum,Assyrian Art, 668-631 BC
Lion Hunt, British Museum, Assyrian Art, 668-631 BC


Any questions about Continuous Narrative? Feel free to send questions on social media or via email!

The idea for THATKid Tuesday stemmed from the Kid Pack’s glossary. The Kid Pack has supplemental exercises for after your Louvre hunt, from a Michelangelo Connect-the-Dots and a Mona Lisa sticker-puzzle to a Botticelli Spot-the-Difference. Good for train rides or long French dinners, kids can also pick up on some terms like composition, perspective and the lot. As THATMuse has grown to include the British Museum, the Victoria & Albert and Musée d’Orsay, THATKid Tuesday's blog version has grown to include other examples.

Tune in the first Tuesday of the month if you'd like another art history dose of THATKid.